Wednesday, January 18, 2017

[TransportNews] Prof. Ethan Elkind: Measure S: L.A.’s Horrible Ballot Measure To Worsen The Housing Crunch

Posted on January 18, 2017, 9:15 am By 
Super scary "overdevelopment" strikes L.A.
Super scary “overdevelopment” strikes L.A.
After just passing a landmark sales tax measure in November to boost transit investments, Los Angeles now risks throwing all that progress out the window this March.

Local NIMBYs have placed Measure S (as in “Sucky”) on the ballot then, in order to effectively stick the city in formaldehyde to benefit current property owners.  They claim it will save the city from an “overdevelopment” housing boom and corruption of City Hall leaders by developers.

Shane Phillips, policy director of Abundant Housing LA, takes on these charges in an op-ed in yesterday’s Los Angeles Times:

Far from experiencing a housing boom, Los Angeles is almost 30 years into a prolonged housing slump.
Data source: American Community SurveyData from the American Community Survey shows that between 1940 and 1990, L.A. built between 150,000 and 250,000 homes each decade. In the decades since, we’ve averaged fewer than 100,000. The 2010-2019 decade isn’t looking any better. As of 2015, only 13% of the city’s housing stock was built after 1990.

He notes property owners have an incentive to clamp down on supply through this initiative:

2015 report by the state Legislative Analyst’s Office claims that L.A. County built 1 million fewer homes than were needed to keep housing prices in line with average U.S. growth rates over the past 30 years. The latest data from the Census Bureau puts L.A.’s rental vacancy rates at historic lows of less than 3%, which has empowered landlords to raise rents on existing homes and has driven up the cost of new development. Of the most crowded 1% of census tracts in the U.S., about half are in L.A. County. These are the symptoms of a housing shortage, not an oversupply.
Some might argue that the problem isn’t too little construction, it’s just that L.A. is full up. We’ve run up against the mountains, the ocean and neighboring jurisdictions. But in reality, a city is only full when it chooses to be, and bad luck to anyone who doesn’t already own property when that choice is made.
Meanwhile, he cites Seattle as a city that is building smart around transit.  As a result, it’s largely been able to stabilize rents through targeted density.

It will be a shame if this measure passes and dooms future generations in the region to stifling housing costs or long commutes, all while turning Los Angeles into a third world-style bastion of inequality, as only the wealthy can afford homes.  I hope that reality never comes to pass, but it will take defeating this measure in March to prevent it.


(Source: http://www.ethanelkind.com/measure-s-l-a-s-horrible-ballot-measure-to-worsen-the-housing-crunch/)

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