Sunday, July 10, 2016

SANDAG: San Diego County's 08 November Transportation & Environment Ballot Measure


San Diego County Road Repair, Transit, Traffic Relief, Safety and Water Quality Measure

Priorities SANGAD website logo

A ballot measure to keep San Diego moving forward

This funding measure is designed to provide a dedicated source of local revenue to invest in our region’s transportation future. In November, voters countywide will be asked whether they support increasing the local sales and use tax by one half-cent to fund specific highway, transit, open space, bike, and pedestrian projects throughout the community. This sales tax increase is similar to the TransNet half-cent sales tax for transportation projects that has funded completion of hundreds of projects across the San Diego region.
SANDAG expects the half-cent sales tax increase would:
  • Invest in our region’s future transportation system to support the growing population
  • Create local jobs
  • Provide local control for municipalities to fix roads and fill potholes
  • Have transparent oversight by local taxpayers to make sure funds are spent responsibly
  • Help address fire safety through open space management and road improvements

Why is a new sales tax needed?

San Diego Forward: The Regional Plan was approved by the SANDAG Board of Directors in October 2015 after three years of extensive public engagement. The process resulted in a plan that includes a careful balance of projects and programs that will continue to build choices into our transportation system. Our region’s population continues to grow, meaning there are more people that need to go to work, school, and run errands, and whether they choose to go by bus, train, car, bike, or walk, a new local funding source is needed to implement projects and programs in the Regional Plan. If two-thirds or more of the voters do not approve the proposed measure, the current sales tax rate would not increase. As a result, these projects might not be implemented or the San Diego region would need to find other ways to pay for these projects.

What projects are included?

Explore our interactive map to learn where highway and transit projects could be completed near you. The mix of projects and programs to be funded by this sales tax was carefully prepared by looking at the needs of the region and using input from the public and the SANDAG Board of Directors. The result is a balanced plan that covers several project categories:
Source: Ordinance and Expenditure Plan, SANDAG Board of Directors, July 8, 2016
View these informational fliers to learn more about subregional projects that would be completed with funds from a new local half-cent sales tax: North County Coastal | North County Inland | North City of San Diego | Central San Diego |South County | East County
SANDAG recognizes that accelerated completion of certain high priority projects is needed to provide better connections to regional job centers, provide transportation choices, and support economic/environmental opportunities for the San Diego region. These projects – some of which are in various stages of project development – are part of the Priority Corridors Program listed in the Ordinance; if voters approve the ballot measure, work on these projects would be advanced to complete more than a dozen transit and highway projects within 15 years.

How does a half-cent add up?

Every time you shop or dine in San Diego County, a half-cent sales tax could be invested in our transportation system and other local projects. It may not seem like much, but it adds up over time.

funding meaasures graphic picture
If a new half-cent sales tax is approved, it would equate to collecting approximately 23 cents from each person in the region every day. Together with taxes paid by your friends, neighbors, and other taxpayers in the region, these pennies add up to $18 billion1 over 40 years that could fund hundreds of projects to keep you moving. The proposed half-cent sales tax is a sales and use tax charged on retail purchases; it does not apply to purchases such as groceries, household utilities, and prescription medicine and medical supplies.

Your tax dollars at work

TRANSNET LOGOIn 1987 and again in 2004, voters approved TransNet, a half-cent sales tax to provide a stable local funding source for transportation projects. Thanks toTransNet, San Diego County is considered a “self-help” county – our local sales tax helps attract matching state and federal transportation dollars to complete a variety of projects. TransNet funds, and those from the potential new sales tax, stay right here in San Diego to address our region’s priorities; they cannot be taken away by Sacramento.
Over the last quarter century, TransNet helped complete more than 650 highway, transit, bike and pedestrian, open space conservation, local street repairs, and grant projects and programs totaling more than $13.7 billion2. If you take a look around, chances are that you’ll see TransNet-funded improvements every day – on your commute to work or school, meeting friends in your local neighborhood, or enjoying the beautiful environment around us.
View our interactive story map and learn how every TransNet dollar invested in completed projects helped leverage three dollars from state, federal, and other funding sources.

Vision

The mix of projects and programs to be funded by this ballot measure was carefully prepared, resulting in a balanced plan that includes a variety of transportation and infrastructure improvements.
The map below shows where transit and highway projects could be completed. Use the +/- buttons at the top left of the map to zoom in/out and click on the icons or lines to see each project’s description (note: there are multiple projects in some areas, use the arrow icon in each pop-up box to review more project descriptions).
View these informational fliers to learn more about subregional projects that would be completed with funds from a new local half-cent sales tax: North County Coastal | North County Inland | North City of San Diego | Central San Diego |South County | East County

Videos



1Estimated revenue collected based on Series 13 forecast of taxable retail sales, net Board of Equalization fees, in 2015 dollars. 
2SANDAG financial records of TransNet expenditures and leveraged funds from state, federal, and other funding sources, as noted on TransNet Story Map located at KeepSanDiegoMoving.com/TransNet. 

Questions & Answers

What is the SANDAG ballot measure? What projects would a half-cent sales tax fund? View these frequently asked questions and answers to learn more, and see what else people are asking below. Have a question that’s not answered? Use our comment form or tweet @SANDAG with #AskSANDAG and we’ll get back to you. Search for#AskSANDAG on Twitter to follow the current conversation and join us for our next scheduled #AskSANDAG educational Twitter chat on Monday, July 11, 2016, from 1-2 p.m. PST. The initials at the end of our tweets (e.g. ^RR) will let you know which SANDAG staff member is responding to you.

Ballot Measure

At their July 8 meeting, the SANDAG Board of Directors adopted a resolution in order to approve the Ordinance,expenditure planITOC statement of understanding, and ballot language. The Ordinance and ballot language will be submitted to the County of San Diego for inclusion on the ballot for the November 8 election. If the measure is approved by two-thirds of voters in San Diego County, the half-cent sales tax would begin to be collected effective April 1, 2017.
  • This summary of the 30-page Ordinance briefly explains the purpose and meaning of each of the document’s provisions.
  • Priority Corridors Program was developed to advance completion of more than a dozen transit and highway projects within 15 years, if the measure is approved.
The following dates reflect milestones in the development of the Ordinance, expenditure plan, and ballot language:
  • On May 13, the SANDAG Board of Directors reviewed and provided feedback on the draft ordinance and ballot language.
  • Revisions to the draft ordinance, expenditure plan, and ballot language were presented to the Board on May 27.
  • On June 10, further revisions to the Ordinance, expenditure plan, and ballot language were presented to the Board, based on feedback received at the May 27 meeting, including the addition of language in the Ordinance to include a goal of completing a majority of priority corridor projects in 15 years.
  • On June 24, the Board considered further refinements to the Ordinance and ballot language and the first reading of the Ordinance was conducted. Changes approved for inclusion in the Ordinance on June 24 were based on public comment and included changes in Section 22 to include stronger language regarding the 15-year timeline for completing projects in the Priority Corridors Program and language requiring SANDAG to use a skilled and trained workforce on its construction projects. An additional change was made in the Independent Taxpayer Oversight Committee (ITOC) attachment to the Ordinance to add two seats to the ITOC.
  • The second reading and presentation of the Ordinance and supporting documentation occurred at the Board’s July 8 meeting, when the final Ordinance, expenditure plan, and ballot language was adopted. The Board authorized submission of the Ordinance and ballot language to the County of San Diego for inclusion on the ballot for the November 8 election.
Ballot Measure Image
On July 8, 2016 the SANDAG Board voted to place a measure before the voters titled ‘San Diego County Road Repair, Transit, Traffic Relief, Safety and Water Quality Measure.’ Prior to the Board’s vote, SANDAG prepared informational materials that referred to the proposed measure as ‘Keep San Diego Moving Forward.’ Information that refers to ‘Keep San Diego Moving Forward’ is equally applicable to the ballot measure. 



(Source: http://priorities.sandag.org/; http://priorities.sandag.org/ballotMeasure)

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